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Sharkwater: The Explosive Documentary Film on the Costa Rica Shark Fin Trade

Rob Stewart tells the amazing story of the making of the documentary firm Sharkwater.  Rob uncovers the connection between the illegal shark fin trade, the mafia and the Costa Rican government.  Hear the story of how they were chased down by guns boats during the making of the film by the Costa Rican government.  Get the inside scoop of the story behind this remarkable film directly from the Director/Producers mouth.

Also Visit the Sharkwater Website
More  Information Here About Declining Shark Populations in Costa Rica

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Filed under: Wildlife Conservation, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Cutting Down Trees to Save the Rainforest


Sustainable Forestry has been a solution in Papua New Guinea.  (See Video Below) The management planned developed by locals and environmental groups mimic the natural dynamic of the forest. By carefully observing the natural cessation of different native trees and their different roles in the forest ecosystem, they recreated the natural processes in the forest. Through the execution of this plan the forest areas were fully regenerated with virtually no long term negative effects on the forest. At the same time providing a sustainable income source for the people living on the land.

Filed under: Analog Forestry, Reforestation, , , , , , ,

Tropical Wetlands Sequester 80% More Carbon than Temperate Wetlands

Tropical wetlands store 80 percent more carbon than temperate wetlands, reports a new study that compared ecosystems in Costa Rica and Ohio.

William Mitsch of Ohio State University and colleagues found that the tropical wetland in Costa Rica accumulated around 1 ton of carbon per acre [2.63 t/ha] per year, while the temperate wetland in Ohio accumulated 0.6 tons of carbon per acre [1.4 t/ha] per year.

“Finding out how much carbon has accumulated over a specific time period gives us an indication of the average rate of carbon sequestration, telling us how valuable each wetland is as a carbon sink,” said Mitsch. “We already know wetlands are outstanding coastal protection systems, and yet wetlands continue to be destroyed around the planet. Showing that wetlands are gigantic carbon sequestration machines might end up being the most convincing reason yet to preserve them.”

Mitsch says that while wetlands are a natural source of methane – a potent greenhouse gas – from decomposition, CO2 sequestration appears to balance net carbon emissions.

“A big issue in wetland science is how carbon sequestration balances against the release of greenhouse gases,” Mitsch said. “Methane is a more effective greenhouse gas than is carbon dioxide in terms of how much radiation it absorbs, but it also oxidizes in the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide does not degrade – it is an end product. If you take that into account, I think wetlands are very effective systems for sequestering carbon.”

Mitsch conducted the study with graduate student Blanca Bernal, who presented the findings Wednesday at the Geological Society of America meeting in Houston.

Filed under: Carbon Offsets, Climate Change, , , , , , , , ,

The Amphibian Extinction Crisis – Amphibian Ark

amphibian ark

From Amphibian Ark

Amphibians are an important component of the global ecosystem, as indicators of environmental health and contributors to human health. They watched the dinosaurs come and go, but today almost half of them are themselves threatened with extinction. Addressing the amphibian extinction crisis represents the greatest species conservation challenge in the history of humanity.

amphibians frogs lizards toad costa ricaThe global conservation community has formulated a response in the Amphibian Conservation Action Plan, and an integral part of that response is the Amphibian Ark, in which select species that would otherwise go extinct will be maintained in captivity until they can be secured in the wild. Without immediate captive management as a stopgap component of an integrated conservation effort, hundreds of species could become extinct.

Addressing the amphibian extinction crisis represents the greatest species conservation challenge in the history of humanity. One third to one half of all amphibian species are threatened with extinction, with probably more than 120 already gone in recent years. The IUCN Global Amphibian Assessment has alerted us to the fact that hundreds of species face threats that cannot be mitigated in the wild, they require zoos to save them in the short term until adequate conservation measures to secure wild populations can be developed. Comparable calls to action are included in other IUCN documents.

amphibians frogs lizards toad costa ricaThe World Association of Zoos and Aquariums (WAZA) has joined with two branches of the IUCN Species Survival Commission (IUCN/SSC) – the Conservation Breeding Specialist Group (CBSG) and the Amphibian Specialist Group (ASG) – to form the Amphibian Ark (AArk). Since 2006 the Amphibian Ark has been helping the ex situ community to address the captive components of the Amphibian Conservation Action Plan, saving as many species as possible by providing global coordination, technical guidance, training, necessary linkages to other IUCN groups, communications, and guiding publicity and capital campaigns.

Without immediate captive management as a stopgap component of an integrated conservation effort, hundreds of species will become extinct. This conservation challenge is one that we, the ex situ community, are uniquely capable of addressing. Never before has the conservation community at large charged zoos and aquariums with a task of this magnitude. This is an opportunity for every zoo and aquarium, regardless of size, to make a vital conservation contribution, and for our community to be broadly acknowledged as a credible conservation partner. Supporting this call to action is clearly within the financial capacity of all zoos and aquariums, and engages the diverse expertise found within all institutions. Our goal is 100% participation of WAZA zoos and aquariums and the regional associations. If we do not respond immediately and on an unprecedented scale, much of an entire vertebrate class will be lost, and we will have failed in our most basic conservation mission as defined in the World Zoo and Aquarium Conservation Strategy.

Filed under: Climate Change, Family Eco Travel, Wildlife Conservation, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Saving Mono Titi Conservation Project Top Donors

Eco preservation Society would like to thank our top donors:

Charles Turner $23,000
Eco Interactive Vacations $10,000
Boyero Tours $500
Firetown $500
David Abernathy $200
Search Feature $100
Judy Orr $100
Jennifer Karlen $100
Milan Cole $100
Lisa Gray $100
Wayne Long $100
William Myers $100.00
Suzie Norvich $35
Robert Kennedy $35.00
Michael Higdon  $35.00

To Help Save Mono Titi – CLICK HERE


Related Stories:
More about the Saving Mono Titi documentary
A history of African Palm Production
Ten Reasons not to feed the monkeys.
Costa Rican company leads Resource Revolution

Other Resurces:
Saving Mono Titi Web Site
Eco Preservation Society

Kids Saving the Rainforest
ASCOMOTI

Filed under: Family Eco Travel, Reforestation, Sustainable Living, Wildlife Conservation, , , , , , , , ,

National Geographic Human Footprint – Fruit Consumption

National Geographic Human FootprintNational Geographic Human Footprint takes a look at the amount of fruit the average person will consume in a lifetime.

Part Three – Meat Consumption
Part Four – Eggs for a Lifetime
Part Five – Bread
Part Six- Fruit Consumption
Part Seven – Soda Consumption

Part Eight – Showers
Part Nine – Hygiene and Cosmetics

Filed under: Sustainable Development, , , , , , , , ,

National Geographic Human Footprint – The Eggs We Consume

National Geographic Human FootprintNational Geographic demonstrates a lifetime of egg consumption by an average individual.

Part One – Introduction
Part Two – Milk & Daily Industry
Part Three – Meat Consumption

Part Four – Eggs for a Lifetime
Part Five – Bread
Part Six- Fruit Consumption

Filed under: Sustainable Living, , , , , , , , , ,

National Geographic’s Human Foot Print – Bread Consumption

Human Footprint BreadHow much bread will you consume in your lifetime?

Part Three – Meat Consumption
Part Four – Eggs for a Lifetime
Part Five – Bread
Part Six- Fruit Consumption
Part Seven – Soda Consumption

Part Eight – Showers
Part Nine – Hygiene and Cosmetics

Filed under: Sustainable Living, , , , , , , , ,

National Geographic Human Footprint – Meat Consumption

Human Footprint Meat

National Geographic looks at human consumption and our impact on earth. There is a look at the Meat production industry.

Part One – Introduction
Part Two – Milk & Daily Industry
Part Three – Meat Consumption

Part Four – Eggs for a Lifetime
Part Five – Bread
Part Six- Fruit Consumption

Filed under: Sustainable Living, , , , , , , , , ,

Costa Rica’s Harlequin Frog, once thought extict, florishes on the Rainmaker Reserve.

Costa Rica Frog

It has been suspected for some time that global warming may cause widespread amphibian extinctions. In a study published in 2006 by J. Alan Pounds suggested that Costa Rica Frogmany harlequin frog species (Atelopus) across Central and South America have disappeared due to deadly infectious diseases spurred by changing water and air temperatures.

At one time the Harlequin Frog (actually a toad) was thought to be extinct. In 2003 the Harlequin Frog was rediscovered in the primary rain forest of the Rainmaker Reserve on the Central Pacific Coast of Costa Rica.

“Disease is the bullet killing frogs, but climate change is pulling the trigger,” said Pounds, lead study author and resident scientist at Costa Rica’s Monteverde Cloud Forest Preserve.

“Global warming is wreaking havoc on amphibians and will cause staggering losses of biodiversity if we don’t do something fast.”

Costa Rica VacationThe World Conservation Union (IUCN) has listed this frog as Critically Endangered and facing an extremely high risk of extinction in the wild, because most of them have disappeared since 1988. In 1996, in fact, scientists feared that all of the more than one hundred populations known to exist in Costa Rica were already gone. Seven years later, however, a tiny population was discovered at Rainmaker Reserve.

About two-thirds of the 110 known harlequin frog species are believed to have vanished during the 1980s and 1990s. The primary culprit, Pounds suggests, is the disease-causing chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

Amphibian skin is extremely thin, which makes frogs acutely sensitive to even minor changes in temperature, humidity, and air or water quality. It also makes frogs more susceptible to chytrid fungus.

Costa Rica FrogThe new study suggests that temperature extremes may have previously helped keep the deadly disease in check. But new climate cycles are now moderating those annual temperature swings.

Global warming has increased evaporation in the tropical mountains of the Americas, which in turn has promoted cloud formation, the study reports. That cloud cover may have actually decreased daytime temperatures by blocking sunlight. At the same time, it may have served as an insulating blanket to raise nighttime highs.

Pounds believes the combination has created ideal conditions for the spread of the frog-killing fungus, which grows and reproduces best at temperatures between 63° and 77°F (17° and 25°C).

Related Article about Rainmaker Reserve.

Related Article About Amphibians in Costa Rica

Harlequin Frogs True Toads and Relatives: Bufonidae – Harlequin Frog (atelopus Varius): Species Accounts

Extraordinary Video from Rainmaker Reserve

Filed under: Climate Change, Wildlife Conservation, , , , , , , , , , , ,

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